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Druva Cloud Platform expands with Apollo

Endpoint backup specialist Druva's Apollo service for its cloud platform provides a management plane for IaaS and PaaS workloads. Features include snapshot management.

Druva moved to help manage data protection in the cloud with its latest Apollo software as a service, which helps protect workloads in Amazon Web Services through the Druva Cloud Platform.

The company's new service provides a single control plane to manage infrastructure-as-a-service and platform-as-a-service cloud workloads.

Druva, based in Sunnyvale, Calif., sells two cloud backup products, Druva InSync and Druva Phoenix, for its Druva Cloud Platform. The enterprise-level Druva InSync backs up endpoint data across physical and public cloud storage. The Druva Phoenix agent backs up and restores data sets in the cloud for distributed physical and virtual servers. Phoenix applies global deduplication at the source and points archived server backups to the cloud target.

There is a big change going on throughout the industry in how data is being managed. The growth is shifting toward secondary data.
Steven Hillsenior storage analyst, 451 Research

Apollo enables data management of Druva Cloud Platform workloads under a single control plane so administrators can do snapshot management for backup, recovery and replication of Amazon Web Services instances. It automates service-level agreements with global orchestration that includes file-level recovery. It also protects Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud instances.

Druva Apollo is part of an industrywide trend among data protection vendors to bring all secondary data under global management across on-premises and cloud storage.

"There is a big change going on throughout the industry in how data is being managed," said Steven Hill, senior storage analyst for 451 Research. "The growth is shifting toward secondary data. Now, secondary data is growing faster than structured data, and that is where companies are running into a challenge."

"Apollo will apply snapshot policies," said Dave Packer, Druva's vice president of product and alliance marketing. "It will automate many of the lifecycles of the snapshots. That is the first feature of Apollo."

Automation for discovery, analysis and information governance is on the Druva cloud roadmap, Packer said.

Druva last August pulled in $80 million in funding, bringing total investments into the range of $200 million for the fast-growing vendor. Druva claims to have more than 4,000 worldwide customers that include NASA, Pfizer, NBCUniversal, Marriott Hotels, Stanford University and Lockheed Martin.

Druva has positioned its data management software to go up against traditional backup vendors Commvault and Veritas Technologies, which also are transitioning into broad-based data management players. It's also competing with startups Rubrik, which has raised a total of $292 million in funding since 2015 for cloud data management, and Cohesity, which has raised $160 million.

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